Diabetes Awareness (VTQ)

Who can take this Course?

Professions from healthcare and social services such as
Care workers, Nurses, Doctors, Families Hospital workers, In-home carers etc

Mode:

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Online

Price

30

Hrs

1

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Classroom

Enrol
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Enrol

Certificate:

VTQ Level

About the Course

Diabetes is a growing epidemic that affects people across all demographics, socioeconomic backgrounds, and cultures.

Diabetes is a silent killer. And Diabetes Awareness (VTQ) is bringing it to the limelight. Just 7% of the UK population has diabetes, but 1 million people have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes, and 40,000 children are diagnosed with diabetes every year. You may be wondering why these numbers seem so high. The answer is that diabetes isn't always recognised or diagnosed until it's too late. Diabetes can cause serious complications such as heart disease, blindness and kidney failure if not treated early on. But there's a reason behind that - we're living longer and eating healthier these days, which means more cases of diabetes are being diagnosed in adults and children.



The cost of undiagnosed type 2 diabetes is enormous! The NHS spends at least £10 billion yearly on treating complications associated with this disease alone, equivalent to 10% of its budget. 80% of this money goes towards treating diabetic complications like heart disease and kidney failure; only 20% is spent on finding ways to prevent it from happening in the first place. And one in six hospital patients has been reported as having undiagnosed Type 2 Diabetes - surely something needs to be done about this? Understanding the disease and its symptoms can help you take control of your health before it's too late. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease in which the body's immune system attacks the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. This results in reduced or absent insulin production, a hormone that helps manage blood sugar levels. Symptoms of type 1 diabetes typically develop shortly after birth but can also occur at any age. In most cases, type 1 diabetes can be controlled with daily medication and regular monitoring by a healthcare professional.

Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body doesn't use insulin properly or when your pancreas can't produce enough insulin because you have developed resistance to it over time.

The most common symptoms of type 2 diabetes are extreme thirst, frequent urination, weight loss, fatigue, and blurred vision. Although type 2 diabetes can be controlled with medication and regular monitoring by a healthcare professional, it is more difficult to reverse than type 1 diabetes. There is no one cause of diabetes, but the condition is linked to several factors, including obesity, impaired blood sugar control due to genetic or environmental factors, and diseases such as hypertension and heart disease. If left untreated, diabetes can lead to health complications such as kidney failure and stroke. There is no known cure for diabetes, but there are treatments that can help manage or reverse the disease. If you have been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, your healthcare professional will likely recommend a program of intensive insulin therapy and regular blood sugar monitoring. If you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, your healthcare professional may suggest weight loss, exercise, and medication to control blood sugar levels.

Diabetes is a disease that affects your entire body. It can affect your eyes, kidneys, and nerves. Left untreated or not managed properly, it can lead to serious health issues like cardiovascular disease, diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy. There are two types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes is when your body doesn't use insulin properly, while type 2 diabetes is when your pancreas can't produce enough insulin because you have developed resistance to it over time. Symptoms of both types of diabetes include extreme thirst, frequent urination, weight loss, fatigue and blurred vision. While either form of the disease can be controlled with medication and regular monitoring by a healthcare professional, reversal therapy for type 2 diabetes is more complex than reversing treatment for type 1 Diabetes.

Many factors contribute to diabetes, including genetics, lifestyle choices and the environment. Some factors that can increase your risk of developing type 2 diabetes include being overweight or obese, having a family history of the disease, smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol, and race/ethnicity, e.g., African American, South Asian.

Diabetes is also affected by diet; for people with type 2 diabetes, eating too many carbohydrates can lead to insulin resistance and trigger the disease. There is no single cure for diabetes – but there are treatments that can help manage or reverse it. There are a variety of treatments available to manage diabetes.

Physical activity can help lower blood sugar levels and improve overall health. Exercise can also help prevent type 2 diabetes from developing in people with the disease. Doctors may prescribe exercise as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for people with diabetes or to manage high blood sugar levels before they become serious. In addition, physical activity may be beneficial for those without diabetes in terms of decreasing the risk of heart disease and other chronic conditions, such as obesity and hypertension. Diet changes can help lower blood sugar levels and improve overall health. People with diabetes should follow a healthy diet with plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, low-fat dairy products, and lean protein sources. Restricting saturated fats and cholesterol can also help to reduce the risk of heart disease in people with diabetes. Some medications may be necessary to manage type 2 diabetes; these include insulin (for people with type 1 diabetes) or oral antidiabetics (such as metformin). While there is no cure for type 2 Diabetes, managing the disease through medication and regular monitoring by an expert can help to reduce the risk of serious complications. If you have been diagnosed with either form of diabetes, your healthcare professional will likely recommend a program of intensive insulin therapy along with regular blood tests and medical check-ups.



Diabetes is a growing epidemic that affects people across all demographics, socioeconomic backgrounds, and cultures. Understanding the disease and its symptoms can help you take control of your health before it's too late. With Diabetes Awareness (VTQ), you can learn more about the condition, why it's essential to monitor it, and how you can prevent or manage it. The course also aims to educate people about the warning signs of hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia, which are especially important for anyone caring for a patient with diabetes. We're here to help you on your journey!